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    “When the Forgotten Borough Reigned: The 1964 Little League World Series Champions” chronicles the amazing team from Staten Island that won the 1964 Little League World Series. Held on the 25th anniversary of the founding of Little League baseball, that World Series was unique and memorable. The final game was won on a no-hitter spun by a pitcher on an All-Star team from the middle of Staten Island, the “forgotten borough” that appeared to have more in common with the American heartland than the rest of New York City. Not only had a Big Apple team never before even qualified for the World Series, but it was the first time a U.S. team defeated an international one for the championship. The members of the victorious Mid-Island Little League team were treated to a ticker tape parade in lower Manhattan and a reception by the mayor as well as meetings with celebrities and baseball icons, experiencing a degree of fame few adults ever do while uniting the borough and city in frenzied celebration.

    The 1964 Little League World Series, held on the 25th anniversary of the founding of Little League baseball, was unique and memorable. The final game was won on a no-hitter spun by a pitcher on an All-Star team from the middle of Staten Island, the “forgotten borough” that appeared to have more in common with the American heartland than the rest of New York City. Not only had a Big Apple team never before even qualified for the World Series, but it was the first time a U.S. team defeated an international one – in that case, an All-Star squad from Monterrey, Mexico – for the championship. The members of the victorious Mid-Island Little League team were treated to a ticker tape parade in lower Manhattan and a reception by the mayor as well as meetings with celebrities such as Lucille Ball and baseball icons including Casey Stengel.

    When the Forgotten Borough Reigned: The 1964 Little League World Series Champions” takes the reader back to 1964, a transformational year for America in which baseball still firmly held its position as the treasured national pastime. Months before the opening of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, which quickly led to a tidal wave of change throughout Staten Island, there was a magical summer during which fourteen boys, none older than twelve, experienced a degree of fame few adults ever do while uniting the borough and city in frenzied celebration.